Injection intramuscular steroide

No carcinogenic potential was demonstrated in mice treated subcutaneously with octreotide for 85-99 weeks at doses up to 2000 mcg/kg/day (8x the human exposure based on body surface area ). In a 116-week subcutaneous study in rats administered octreotide, a 27% and 12% incidence of injection site sarcomas or squamous cell carcinomas was observed in males and females, respectively, at the highest dose level of 1250 mcg/kg/day (10x the human exposure based on body surface area) compared to an incidence of 8%-10% in the vehicle-control groups. The increased incidence of injection site tumors was most probably caused by irritation and the high sensitivity of the rat to repeated subcutaneous injections at the same site. Rotating injection sites would prevent chronic irritation in humans. There have been no reports of injection site tumors in patients treated with Sandostatin Injection for at least 5 years. There was also a 15% incidence of uterine adenocarcinomas in the 1250 mcg/kg/day females compared to 7% in the saline -control females and 0% in the vehicle-control females. The presence of endometritis coupled with the absence of corpora lutea, the reduction in mammary fibroadenomas, and the presence of uterine dilatation suggest that the uterine tumors were associated with estrogen dominance in the aged female rats which does not occur in humans.

Loved the article but i have to disagree with you on one thing and that’s injecting in the fat is more painful. For me personally, i dont even feel the needle go in (using my outer thigh fat) whereas when i tried injecting into the muscle sometimes I’d clench/flex after the injection – that hurt a bit. Not saying it’s the same for everyone of course.
I never thought about warming up my T though! My place is chilly so thats a good idea to hold it in my hands for a while. Maybe keep it wrapped in power towel or something?
Thanks for posting this.

For an intramuscular injection, a needle is inserted with a quick thrust at a 90-degree angle. The needle penetrates the skin and subcutaneous tissue, and the medicine is deposited in the underlying muscle. The deltoid muscle in the upper arm is the preferred injection site for adults. For a subcutaneous injection, the needle is inserted at a 45-degree angle so that it pierces the skin but does not reach the muscle tissue. The doctor or nurse may pinch your skin to pull the subcutaneous tissue away from the muscle.. For adults, the preferred injection site is the outer aspect of the arm.

Injection intramuscular steroide

injection intramuscular steroide

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injection intramuscular steroideinjection intramuscular steroideinjection intramuscular steroideinjection intramuscular steroideinjection intramuscular steroide