Topical corticosteroid treatments

Subjects with Target Lesion Parameter Clear at Endpoint Luxiq Foam
n (%) BMV lotion
n (%) Placebo foam
n (%) Scaling 30 (47%) 22 (35%) 2 (6%) Erythema 26 (41%) 16 (25%) 2 (6%) Plaque Thickness 42 (66%) 25 (40%) 5 (16%) Investigator's Global: Subjects Completely Clear or Almost Clear at Endpoint 43 (67%) 29 (46%) 6 (19%)

Category C. Corticosteroids are generally teratogenic in laboratory animals when administered systemically at relatively low dosage levels. The more potent corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after dermal application in laboratory animals. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women on teratogenic effects from topically applied corticosteroids. Therefore, topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Drugs of this class should not be used extensively on pregnant patients, in large amounts, or for prolonged periods of time.

Cream, ointment, solution, gel, or lotion: Apply to affected area two to four times a day

Comments :
-Occlusive dressings may be used for the management of psoriasis or other recalcitrant conditions.
-If an infection develops, the use of occlusive dressings should be discontinued and appropriate antimicrobial therapy initiated.
-The safety and efficacy of drug use for longer than 4 weeks have not been established.

Use: Relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses

Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) suppression and/or manifestations of Cushing's syndrome in some patients. Clobetasol propionate has been shown to suppress the HPA axis at doses as low as 2 g/day. Conditions which increase systemic absorption include application of high-potency corticosteroids, use over large surface areas, prolonged use, use in areas where the epidermal barrier is disrupted (., skin abrasion), use in pediatric patients, use in patients with hepatic disease, and the use of an occlusive dressing. Clobetasol propionate preparations should not be used with occlusive dressings. Patients receiving large doses of a potent topical corticosteroid like clobetasol should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression and manifestations of Cushing's syndrome. If these effects are noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent corticosteroid. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt and complete upon discontinuation. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of withdrawal may occur, requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids. It is recommended that the administration of clobetasol creams, ointments, gels, or topical solutions be limited to no more than 14 days duration, in order to limit the risk of systemic effects. Clobetasol propionate emollient creams may be administered for up to 4 weeks duration if applied to no more than 5—10% of body surface area. The total weekly dose limit of 50 g or 50 mL of a % preparation should not be exceeded for any clobetasol preparation.

It is important to use the correct amount of topical steroid for your eczema, as instructed by your healthcare professional. Topical steroids should be applied with clean hands so that the skin just glistens. It can sometimes be difficult to judge how much steroid to use and there are guidelines on the amount required to cover body areas that are affected by eczema. These are based on the Finger Tip Unit (FTU), and explained in detail in our fact sheet which you can download as a pdf from the related documents to the right of this page.

Topical corticosteroid treatments

topical corticosteroid treatments

Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) suppression and/or manifestations of Cushing's syndrome in some patients. Clobetasol propionate has been shown to suppress the HPA axis at doses as low as 2 g/day. Conditions which increase systemic absorption include application of high-potency corticosteroids, use over large surface areas, prolonged use, use in areas where the epidermal barrier is disrupted (., skin abrasion), use in pediatric patients, use in patients with hepatic disease, and the use of an occlusive dressing. Clobetasol propionate preparations should not be used with occlusive dressings. Patients receiving large doses of a potent topical corticosteroid like clobetasol should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression and manifestations of Cushing's syndrome. If these effects are noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent corticosteroid. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt and complete upon discontinuation. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of withdrawal may occur, requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids. It is recommended that the administration of clobetasol creams, ointments, gels, or topical solutions be limited to no more than 14 days duration, in order to limit the risk of systemic effects. Clobetasol propionate emollient creams may be administered for up to 4 weeks duration if applied to no more than 5—10% of body surface area. The total weekly dose limit of 50 g or 50 mL of a % preparation should not be exceeded for any clobetasol preparation.

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